Nasum : Swedish Grindcore legends ! an interview with Anders Jakobson

Interview With NASUM Grindcore Legends

Nasum Grindcore Sweden


ENGLISH ORIGINAL VERSION/VERSION FRANÇAISE 


When it comes to talk about big Grindcore bands from the 90's and early 00's you cannot not think of Nasum. The Swedish band was a huge phenomenon back then and are still in all "modern Grincore" fans memories. Anders Jakobson, founder and guitarist of the band, did agree to talk about the story of that legendary band, the tragic accident that ended their activities and Grindcore in general I thank him again to have take time to give us detailed answers. This is a piece of Grindcore history...

Nasum was created in 1992 in Örebro, Sweden by you,  Anders Jakobson (guitar) and Rickard Alriksson (drums/vocals) first as a side project to death metal band Necrony. So you came from death metal, what is the moment and the facts that brings you to grindcore? 

As many other kids of the 70’s I was raised on hardrock and heavy metal, and always looking for harder and more extreme stuff. I went from the classic rock stuff that my brother taught me to like to Mötley Crüe and W.A.S.P. and eventually I found thrash metal. I was not aware of the underground until I went to a Metallica show in Stockholm in 1989. After the show I found some mailorder lists from CBR (Chickenbrain Records) that at that time was the main Swedish distributor of Earache Records. I discovered hardcore, grindcore and death metal through this list at the same time and ordered some stuff – a few Swedish hardcore compilations and the classic “Grindcrusher“ from Earache. A whole new world opened up! A year later Necrony formed and we were a band heavily inspired by Carcass, but not sounding particularly like them. By that grindcore was a natural source of inspiration, so at some point when Rickard and I were writing long and semi-complex death metal tracks we fooled around with some basic grindcore stuff just to clear our minds, and that was it. Nasum was born, and both bands co-existed for some time.

 I know you were both big Napalm Death fans, and you wanted to “make grindcore great again” (lol) when goregrind/pornogrind became bigger genres. Whose bands or styles were your principal influences? What was your real purpose? 

That’s not entirely true, but what I can confirm is that we were really serious about grindcore. “Grindcore is no joke”, we used to say, and the purpose was just to play that kind or music. Anyway – yes, Napalm Death was the ultimate source of inspiration along with Terrorizer, Repulsion and the whole Earache catalogue, more or less. But there were some early Swedish grindcore bands that meant a lot, like G-Anx and Filthy Christians (which ultimately was an Earache band). Although a few other sources of inspiration were added along the way, we could always put on Napalm Death, Repulsion or G-Anx and get that magic kick. And I can still do that.


When “Blind World” has landed on our record players, did you think anytime you will become that big?

 No, that was impossible to imagine. We were just happy that we had a first release and were ready to do more stuff. But at that time Nasum was just a small side-project to the other bands we were in, and many years later it became our main band. And not even then could we imagine the success that led to you asking these questions with the intention of putting the answers in a printed book. How could we?

Nasum grindcore Blind World EP


As your original models, like Napalm Death, you were a social/political engaged band. How do you see the world today?

 Let’s put it like this: there wouldn’t be any trouble writing Nasum lyrics in 2018! The lyrics on “Helvete” and “Shift” in particular were heavily inspired by the political maneuvers of George W Bush, and little did we know that the US would have an even worse president years later! We could have gotten loads of stuff out of Trump! Going local the current situation in Sweden with the rise of right-wing and racist movements is something we would have attacked as well. On “Helvete” there’s a song called “Living Next Door to Malice” which was about the growth of racism in Denmark at that time (2003), and 10-15 years later it’s the same thing in Sweden and most of the other Scandinavian countries – and all over Europe. That’s very alarming.

On your first album, the incredible “Inhale/exhale” it seems like you have found the perfect grind/death formula. The sound is perfect, with the Swedish death metal sounding guitars, the vocals of Mieszko Talarczyk and yours, Anders Jakobson, are amazing, the album is quite violent but can be easily listened nowadays. What are your feelings about this particular album today? Can you give us some details about the conception of this album? 

It’s been 20 years and that is weird and strange in it’s own way. How could such a long time have passed? I imagine that I am pretty much the same person like I was then, and in some regards I am, but really I am not. Still I remember much from those days. That creative drive that still excites me more than anything else when it comes to music. So, Nasum had been around for five or six years. We had done the first five recordings as a three piece with Rickard Alriksson as the drummer and singer. We had done two live shows with a stand in drummer and then made two additional recordings as a duo with me as the drummer. Over the years we had been in contact with Relapse for different reasons and eventually it lead to an agreement of working together. Initially I believe we were into the idea of doing a mini-album, but along the way it developed into a full-length album. The contract said that we should deliver 45 minutes of music and naïve as we were; we believed it was the hard truth and wrote song after song after song to come up with that amount of music. I remember that up until that particular writing session we usually kept our songs as compact and short as possible, just to be able to have 16 songs on a 7” EP and such nonsense. That way of doing stuff would have meant an album of 60 songs or something, so we let the songs breathe a little bit. In the end the album has 38 songs and could have gained from having less! During this period we didn’t have a proper rehearsal room and I had my drums permanently placed in Soundlab Studios and they used them as a house kit for most of the recordings. That meant that we rehearsed in the studio when we were writing the songs, which probably put us in a quite relaxing mode while recording the actual album. Too bad I didn’t write a diary during this time, it would have been fun to read now.

Nasum Inhale/Exhale LP grindcore


As a lot of grindcore bands before and after you, you made a lot of splits and maxis/Eps. What was the purpose? Was it an opportunity to give a chance to other bands?

 In some regards the split 7” EP or a 7” EP is the optimal format for a grindcore band. It’s long enough to display a number of songs, but short enough to not be repetitive and boring. I guess in our early days, the notion of Agathocles being a grindcore band putting out crazy amounts of splits was inspiring in its own way. And one of those splits happened to be with us, which was not planned at all. I believe the “Blind World” recording was supposed to be a split with Blood Duster. So any way, we did a few and some compilation songs before we were ready to do something bigger, the “Industrislaven” MCD. And then we did some more 7” EP’s splits and compilations stuff, even as we had started to do albums, but eventually it became more important to focus on the albums. Most of the band combinations were put together by the labels. We had no connection to or relationship with bands like Abstain or Warhate, the only real exception was the split with Skitsystem which was planed. 7. On your second LP “Human 2.0” (with Mieszko Talarczyk - guitar, bass and lead vocals, Anders Jakobson - drums and low vocals and Jesper Liveröd – bass) it seems you wanted to do a more violent and contrasted album. The vocals of Mieszko are extreme throatruining but there is also a hardcore groove. For you what is the difference between this album and Inhale/exhale? I know the band wasn’t pleased with the mix? To begin with, we had changed the tunings of our guitars going from standard B tuning to a drop A tuning. That allowed us to get a heavier sound overall but also making it much easier to reach different harmonies and coming closer to a sound of our own. We tried this on a recording between the albums where I had written a few of my songs with this tuning and from that point on we used it (subsequently this type of tuning, albeit not that low, has been used in all my bands after Nasum, i.e. Coldworker and Axis of Despair). The only backlash we had to deal with was relearning all the older Nasum songs in this tuning. Another difference is that we wrote “an album” and not just song after song after song until we had 45 minutes of music, as was the case with “Inhale/Exhale”. With that I mean that we were more aware of what type of songs we needed to write to make a diverse album that would entertain the listener. We also knew, following the success of “Inhale/Exhale” that we actually had a fanbase or at least a number of people that listened to our music. We never really got that response in the very early days, which more or less was before the rise of the Internet. So we were writing for an audience, so to speak. The hardcore/groove addition can be seen as a direct result of trying to be a little more diverse in the sound, but it was also heavily inspired by the studio work Mieszko did for other bands at this point. A song like “Shadows” is very inspired by the band Nine that he recorded a few albums with (and possibly why the line “Thanks to all the band we’ve managed to steal riffs from” is in the credits…). I also think that the fact that we started to do shows and tour and sharing stages with both hardcore and death metal bands had an effect on the sound. A final difference is that Mieszko became the lead singer. Up until “Inhale/Exhale” Nasum had been more of a studio project and we shared the vocals 50-50, but as we started to play live Mieszko had to do all of the vocals. I still sing quite a lot on “Human 2.0” but Mieszko was definitively the lead. As we did the mix I can’t say that we weren’t pleased with it. In fact I have a very clear memory of sitting in Soundlab Studios with Mieszko and listening through the album and really enjoying it. It’s possible that the sound got slightly changed during the mastering process, which was done in the US, but I believe it didn’t make much of a difference. Looking back it would have been nice with a slightly clearer sound as it’s hard to hear what we were doing, but on the other hand the sound gives the album an identity of its own. I think Mieszko was trying out either new ideas or new equipment at the time, because if you put on the “Carnivorous Erection” album by Regurgitate that was recorded at the same time, it has a similar production and sound.

On your second LP “Human 2.0” (with Mieszko Talarczyk - guitar, bass and lead vocals, Anders Jakobson - drums and low vocals and Jesper Liveröd – bass) it seems you wanted to do a more violent and contrasted album. The vocals of Mieszko are extreme throatruining but there is also a hardcore groove. For you what is the difference between this album and Inhale/exhale? I know the band wasn’t pleased with the mix?

To begin with, we had changed the tunings of our guitars going from standard B tuning to a drop A tuning. That allowed us to get a heavier sound overall but also making it much easier to reach different harmonies and coming closer to a sound of our own. We tried this on a recording between the albums where I had written a few of my songs with this tuning and from that point on we used it (subsequently this type of tuning, albeit not that low, has been used in all my bands after Nasum, i.e. Coldworker and Axis of Despair). The only backlash we had to deal with was relearning all the older Nasum songs in this tuning.

Another difference is that we wrote “an album” and not just song after song after song until we had 45 minutes of music, as was the case with “Inhale/Exhale”. With that I mean that we were more aware of what type of songs we needed to write to make a diverse album that would entertain the listener. We also knew, following the success of “Inhale/Exhale” that we actually had a fanbase or at least a number of people that listened to our music. We never really got that response in the very early days, which more or less was before the rise of the Internet. So we were writing for an audience, so to speak.

The hardcore/groove addition can be seen as a direct result of trying to be a little more diverse in the sound, but it was also heavily inspired by the studio work Mieszko did for other bands at this point. A song like “Shadows” is very inspired by the band Nine that he recorded a few albums with (and possibly why the line “Thanks to all the band we’ve managed to steal riffs from” is in the credits…). I also think that the fact that we started to do shows and tour and sharing stages with both hardcore and death metal bands had an effect on the sound.

A final difference is that Mieszko became the lead singer. Up until “Inhale/Exhale” Nasum had been more of a studio project and we shared the vocals 50-50, but as we started to play live Mieszko had to do all of the vocals. I still sing quite a lot on “Human 2.0” but Mieszko was definitively the lead.

As we did the mix I can’t say that we weren’t pleased with it. In fact I have a very clear memory of sitting in Soundlab Studios with Mieszko and listening through the album and really enjoying it. It’s possible that the sound got slightly changed during the mastering process, which was done in the US, but I believe it didn’t make much of a difference. Looking back it would have been nice with a slightly clearer sound as it’s hard to hear what we were doing, but on the other hand the sound gives the album an identity of its own.

I think Mieszko was trying out either new ideas or new equipment at the time, because if you put on the “Carnivorous Erection” album by Regurgitate that was recorded at the same time, it has a similar production and sound.




 In the beginning of this century you became maybe one of the biggest grind bands of the world. One of the biggest metal acts on earth I may say. You were liked by both hardcore and metal fans. How do you analyse it today, almost 20 years later?

 Well, first of all I would like you to tone things down a bit. As long as there is a Napalm Death, there can’t be a bigger grindcore band! And “one of the biggest metal acts on earth” is not true, haha! But, you are right to a certain degree. We were quite big, in that sense a grindcore band can be big, and it’s a weird thought to have today and to look back at. I guess every guy or girl who starts a band dreams about being big, but few get to the level that they are considered one of the top ten bands forever in that specific genre. Now, grindcore is a quite small genre, but never the less it feels quite flattering to be mentioned as a prime example on the Wikipedia page of grindcore or being seen in the metal family tree in the documentary series “Metal Evolution”. It’s bizarre! I think we had the perfect timing when we released “Inhale/Exhale” in 1998. The grindcore wave of the 80’s and 90’s had calmed down and Napalm Death was trying out other sounds, and we filled a void with our album. It could have been a disaster but it worked, and that was what brought us to that place. 

Helvete in 2003: was it an homage to Euronymous shop? (lol) the album is still violent but maybe more melodic than the two first ones. Do you agree with that? Around these times Nostromo became a big band too, what were you thinking about them? 

No, “Helvete” is the Swedish word for “hell”, a common swearword and an overall powerful word that was fitting as an album title at the time in regard to the lyrics and so forth. It’s the same word in Norwegian and almost the same in Danish. But I know that it has an entirely different meaning for French speaking people… Music wise I think “Helvete” is the natural development from the previous albums, but really not THAT different. The big difference is obviously the production, which is much better. Perhaps the best of the four albums. It’s a slightly more produced album, which is a result of Mieszko getting better as an engineer and producer. For me it’s a perfect blend of doing really hard and extreme music but making a sonically accessible album for people that necessarily weren’t grindcore fans. And it worked; we got a lot of attention for the album, winning two Swedish awards and such. The only thing we didn’t do was to tour the album, and that story I will speak about later in this interview… We had Nostromo as a support act for a few dates on the long tour with Napalm Death in 2000. We played with them early on and then again towards the end of the entire tour, so it was like meeting old friends even though they were new acquaintances. Anyway, they were touring on their “Eyesore” EP and the song “Collapse” was one of those songs that stood out with its rhythmic parts. I can say for sure that it inspired the end of the song “Scoop” on “Helvete”. Mieszko then recorded their “Ecce Lex” album here in Örebro in 2002. I am happy the Nostromo is back in the scene and their cover version of “Corrosion”, a song I wrote nearly 20 years ago, is quite relentless!

Nasum Helvete LP grindcore album


Do you think a codified genre as grindcore can evolve? 

To some degree, yes. But in my personal view, grindcore is one of the few genres where the boundaries are limited. There is no “outside the box” for grindcore, because then it’s not grindcore any more. Take death metal as an example. Today you have multiple subgenres, like industrial death metal, pagan death metal, melodic death metal, blackened death metal or whatever bands come up with. For me there is no room for “viking grindcore”, to just take something ridiculous. It’s obvious that I come from an old school grindcore background, which basically is ultrafast and extreme hardcore punk, and I really enjoy that style. Some of the more modern bands have other backgrounds and there for other, evolved sounds, so it’s a matter of taste in the end. But for me, my picture of what grindcore is, is very clear. 

It’s still sad to talk about “Shift” because of what happened to Mieszko that awful day. The album is very intense and very darker than whatever you did before. For me there is some black/death metal sounding parts on that record. Was it some kind of music you were listening to the working of that album? Can you tell us more about the making of this final LP? 

After the recording of “Helvete” we added Urban Skytt as a second guitar player. He made his first show at the release party in Örebro. A few months later Jesper quit the band and we brought in Jon Lindqvist as the new bass player. At this time we were working on a European tour and our agent began booking it. Then things got weird. We had trouble getting in touch with our agent and when we finally got in touch with him the itinerary was incomplete and not booked during the time period we wanted. It became clear to us that he was burnt out and unable to do his work. Another agent tried to repair things but it wasn’t possible. We had to cancel the tour and by that we were unable to tour “Helvete”. Instead we quickly went into writing mode. We had been pleased with the work Relapse had done for us on the first three albums, but as our contract was fulfilled (or so we thought…) we had some discussions with the Örebro based Burning Heart Records, which incidentally had their offices one floor below Soundlab Studios. We thought it was a good idea for us to work with a European label as our biggest market was in Europe. The idea was to start with a mini-album and see how that would pan out. We had a number of songs written and were basically ready to record, but as we left the initial meeting with Burning Heart Mieszko and I talked about the dangers of doing a mini-album. We felt that the amount of songs we would have, like 12-15, could mean that it would be considered as an album by shops and such, and by that be sold at full price when our intention was to make a cheaper product. Suddenly the idea wasn’t attractive anymore and we decided on the spot to write some more and make a proper album, and Burning Heart obviously had no trouble with that. Unfortunately, our contract with Relapse wasn’t fulfilled so we ran into some troubles, which eventually led to an agreement that Relapse still would release the album in the US. In retrospect I think that the change of record labels caused more hassle than benefits, especially since Burning Heart merged into Epitaph and they had little interest in Nasum. But still the “Shift” release was good, and at that time the different labels worked fine for us. As for the actual production of the album – I recall that we had a good flow in the band at this time. Mieszko and I got energy from the new guys, but as the band got geographically split – Mieszko and I in Örebro and Jon and Urban in Stockholm – it quickly got apparent that in order to finish the material for the album, we could only work on 50% of the song with the entire band. The remaining stuff was just Mieszko and I. I remember the actual recording session as a little bit loose and spontaneous, which was a great feeling and something we would have continued with in the future. The reason why some songs have a more metal feel could be that we got some inspiration from being a two-guitar band. We had gotten a new sound live, and knew that we could reproduce some of the more produced songs live. I think that had an impact on the song writing. It’s a good call that you found some black metal sounding stuff, because they are there. I am personally not a huge fan of black metal, I never really got into it, but there were some stuff that I liked. Looking at my songs on the album, there is an obvious black metal inspiration in “The Engine of Death”, which had the working title “NasuMayhem”. But in all honesty, I inherited the inspiration from some riffs that Urban had written, which was totally different from the kind of basic and raw stuff he wrote for Regurgitate.

Nasum Shift Album Grindcore LP


Ok, we cannot avoid talking about the death of Mieszko. I can imagine how devastating it was for you all. When the decision of splitting was made? Did you had any interrogation about it? 

It was a really quick decision once we realized that there was no hope for his survival. Perhaps we should have taken half a year to let reality sink in and then come to some conclusion, but the gut feeling was that loss of Mieszko was a tough loss for the band. It wasn’t just a member who left the band; it was the main voice, one of the main songwriters and obviously the producer. To continue as a band and do new songs and new recordings wouldn’t have been the same, and on top of that we had the grief to handle. 5-6 years later when we talked about doing what eventually became the farewell tour in 2012 it was easier. It was a continuation of the live band Nasum and not the recording band. But back to 2005 and the decision to end the band – it was the right decision to stop being a performing and existing band in that sense but I felt right away that it was unfair to the fans, to Mieszko and to me to just pull the plug entirely. We had a few releases planed and we had a dedicated following that was impossible to ignore, so I decided to keep the band alive as a concept, in lack of a better word, by having an active webpage (and along the line, a Facebook page) and keeping a dialogue with the fans. Nasum is such a huge part of my life that I can’t let it go.

Mieszko Nasum Grindcore


 “Grind Finale” and “Doombringer” can both seen as homages to Mieszko of course. What was the purpose of these records for you as a band? 

It’s important to point out that both project were planed while Mieszko was still alive. The compilation of non-album stuff had been in the works for years. We had collected all the masters and made a few attempts to assemble the project. Actually, we had planed to work in Mieszko’s studio with just that a few days before he left for his Thailand vacation, but in never happened. When I took it upon myself to complete the project it obviously had another meaning than to just make a retrospective collection. It became a way for me to handle the grief following Mieszko’s death and to really go deep into our musical legacy from the beginning to the end. It was supposed to be a “mid-career” milestone but it became the finale, thus the title “Grind Finale”. “Doombringer” was in all honesty not planed before his death as a single release, but it was planed as our side of the split LP with Napalm Death. Most Nasum fans should know that the recording was supposed to be released as a split picture disc with Napalm Death before becoming a single release, but the split was delayed and Relapse released the “Doombringer” CD/LP first. The Japanese tour with Napalm Death was in January 2004 and we began discussing a live split during that tour as our sound engineer managed to get quite good sounding recordings of the shows. Again, it became my project to finish the recording for the release a few years after Mieszko’s death. 

What is the activity of the past members in 2018? How do you see the music scene today? Is there any new bands you like?

 Beginning with myself, I have continued to be a part of the grindcore scene with my “new” band Axis of Despair. We’ve been around for a few years, and we released our debut album “Contempt for Man” earlier this year. Jesper has recently become the second guitarplayer in the fastcore band Massgrav. Quite surprising “career move”, but never the less exciting. Burst had a one-time reunion this year as well, and it might be more, I would believe. Urban has been promoted to Dr Skytt and handles the second guitar in General Surgery since a few years back. I guess Regurgitate isn’t officially dead, but there hasn’t been any action for a very long time. Jon is still with Victims and tours quite a lot, only beaten by Keijo, who is always on the roads with something, be it Rotten Sound, Goat Burner or Morbid Evils. As for new bands, I am afraid I am not really that up to date. I have trouble being excited by new bands, at least not in the same way as I used to be. No matter what genre we talk about. I seem to fall back on older stuff than hunting for something new. But speaking about the grindcore scene in particular I guess my latest finding is Meth Leppard. I just wished they would get a bass player. I am not getting the current “no bass player” trend in grindcore…

Nasum Band Grindcore


 Finally, can you give us your top ten grindcore albums? 

Well, I guess if I should do a list of the best grindcore stuff, I need to include all kinds of formats. And, to keep it even more specific, this list is a guide to how my taste for grindcore was shaped. In alphabetic order: 


  • Assück – Complete discography 
  • Brutal Truth – Extreme Conditions… LP 
  • Carcass – Reek of Putrefaction LP
  • Dropdead – s/t G-Anx – Complete discography 
  • Napalm Death – Mentally Murdered 12” EP 
  • Napalm Death – Peelsessions
  •  Napalm Death/S.O.B. – split 7” flexi 
  • Terrorizer – World Downfall LP
  •  Repulsion – Horrified LP
_________________________________________________________________________________

VERSION FRANÇAISE


Quand on parle des grands groupes de Grindcore des années 90 et 2000 il est impossible de ne pas penser à Nasum. Le groupe suèdois fut un phénomène majeur à l'époque et restent dans la mémoire des fans de "Grindcore Moderne" Anders Jakobson, membre fondateur et guitariste du groupe, a accepté de revenir sur l'histoire de ce groupe légendaire, l'accident tragique qui a mit fin à leur carrière et du Grind en général. Je tiens à le remercier d'avoir pris le temps de nous donner des réponses aussi détaillées. Voici un morceau de l'histoire du Grindcore.


Nasum fut créé en 1992 à Örebro en Suède par toi, Anders Jakobson (guitare) et Rickard Alriksson (Batterie/Chant) d'abord comme un side-project du groupe de Death Metal Necrony. Vous venez donc du Death Metal, qu'est ce qui vous a amenés vers le Grindcore ?

Comme beaucoup de gamins des années 70 j'ai grandi avec le Hard Rock et le Heavy Metal, en cherchant toujours des trucs plus durs et plus extremes. Je suis parti de trucs classic rock que mon frère m'avait fait découvrir pour ensuite aller vers Mötley Crüe et W.A.S.P et j'ai ensuite découvert le Thrash Metal. Je ne connaissais pas l'underground jusqu'à ce que j'aille à un concert de Metallica à Stockholm en 1989. Après ce concert j'ai trouvé des listes de vente par correspondance de CBR (Chickenbrain Records) qui était alors le distributeur suèdois d'Earache Records. J'ai alors découvert le Hardcore, le Grindcore et le Death Metal grâce à cette liste et j'ai commandé quelques trucs (quelques compilations de Hardcore suèdois et le "Grindcrusher" d'Earache). Un nouveau monde s'offrait à moi ! Un an après nous avons formé Necrony sous l'influence très forte de Carcass, mais sans sonner vraiment comme eux. A ce moment là le Grindcore devint une source naturelle d'inspiration, et, à un moment ou Rickard et moi écrivions de longues et semi-complexes chansons de Death Metal nous nous sommes amusés avec des morceaux de Grindcore basique juste pour nous changer les idées, et c'était parti ! Nasum était né et les deux groupes ont co-existé pendant un moment.



Je sais que vous étiez de grands fans de Napalm Death, et que vous vouliez rendre "le grindcore grand à nouveau" (lol) quand le Goregrind et le Pornogrind sont devenus des genres dominants. Quels groupes ou styles étaient vos principales influences ? Quel était votre but ?

Ce n'est pas entièrement vrai, mais je peux confirmer que nous prenions le Grindcore très au sérieux. "le Grindcore n'est pas une blague" disions nous souvent, et le but était simplement de jouer cette musique. Ceci dit, oui, Napalm Death était notre source ultime d'inspiration avec Terrorizer, Repulsion et tout le catalogue Earache, plus ou moins. Mais il y avait aussi des groupes pionniers du Hardcore suèdois qui comptaient beaucoup, comme G-Anx et Filthy Christians (qui devint aussi un groupe signé chez Earache). Même si d'autres sources d'inspiration s'ajoutèrent au fur et à mesure, nous pouvions toujours écouter Napalm Death, Repulsion et G-Anx et retrouver cette magie du départ. Et c'est encore le cas pour moi.

Quand "Blind World" a atterri sur nos platines, pensez vous que vous deviendriez un jour si énormes ?

Non, c'était impossible de l'imaginer. Nous étions déjà contents de sortir un premier disque et étions prêts pour en faire davantage. Mais à cette époque, Nasum n'était qu'un petit side-project par rapport aux autres groupes dans lesquels nous étions , et bien des années ensuite c'est devenu notre groupe principal. Et même là nous n'imaginions pas le succès qui t’amènerait toi à nous poser ces questions avec l'intention de publier les réponses dans un livre. Comment aurions-nous pu ? 




A l'instar de vos modèles initiaux, comme Napalm Death, vous étiez un groupe engagé socialement et politiquement. Comment voyez-vous le monde d'aujourd'hui ?


Disons le comme cela : il ne serait pas compliqué d'écrire des paroles pour Nasum en 2018 ! Les textes sur "Helvete" et "Shift" en particulier étaient grandement inspirés par les manoeuvres politiques de George W. Bush, et nous étions loin de savoir que les USA auraient un président encore pire des années après ! Nous aurions eu tant de choses à dire sur Trump ! Pour rester "local" la situation actuelle en Suède avec la montée de l'extrême droite et les mouvements racistes est quelques chose que nous aurions pu largement attaquer. Sur "Helvete "il y a un morceau qui s'appelle "Living Next Door To Malice" qui parlait de la montée du racisme au Danemark à l'époque (2003) et dix ou quinze ans après c'est pareil en Suède et dans la plupart des pays scandinaves, et partout en Europe. C'est vraiment inquiétant.

Sur votre premier album, l’incroyable "Inhale/Exhale" il semble que vous aviez trouvé la formule idéale du mix grind/death. Le son est parfait, avec des guitares qui ont ce son du Death Metal suèdois, les vocaux de Mieszko Talarczyk et les tiens (Anders) sont incroyables, l'album est plutôt violent mais peut encore s'écouter facilement de nos jours. Quels sont tes sentiments concernant cet album en particulier aujourd'hui ? Peux-tu nous donner quelques détails concernant la conception de cet album ?

Ça fait déjà vingt ans et ça fait bizarre d'une certaine façon. Comment autant de temps a t'il pu passer ? Je pense que je suis à peu près la même personne que j'étais alors et à certains égards je le suis, mais en vérité je ne le suis plus. Je me souviens pourtant de beaucoup de choses de cette époque . Cet élan créatif qui m'excite plus que n'importe quoi d'autre quand il s'agit de musique. Donc, Nasum existait depuis cinq ou six ans. Nous avions fait nos cinq premiers enregistrements à trois avec Rickard Alrisson comme batteur et chanteur. Nous avons donné deux concerts avec un batteur de session et ensuite avons effectué deux enregistrements en tant que duo et c'est moi qui tenait alors la batterie. Au fil du temps nous avions déjà des contacts avec Relapse pour différentes raisons et finalement cela nous a amené à collaborer. A la base, je crois que nous étions sur l'idée de faire un mini-album, mais au fur et à mesure c'est devenu un album. Le contrat (avec Relapse NdT) disait que nous devions produire 45 minutes de musique et, naïfs comme nous l'étions, nous croyions que c'était la pure vérité et nous avons composé morceau après morceau après morceau pour avoir suffisamment de temps de musique. Je n'ai pas oublié que jusqu'à cette session particulière d'écriture nous voulions garder nos morceaux le plus compact et courts que possible, juste pour être capables d'avoir 16 chansons sur un 7''EP et ce genre d'idioties. Si nous avions gardé cette façon de procéder, cela aurait donné un album de plus ou moins 60 chansons, alors nous avons laissé les morceaux respirer un peu plus. Au final, l'album est composé de 38 titres et aurait surement gagné à en avoir moins ! Pendant cette période nous n'avions pas de local de répétition et ma batterie était toujours installée aux Soundlab Studios et ils l'ont utilisé comme une "batterie maison" pour la plupart de leurs enregistrements. Cela veut dire que nous répétions en studio quand nous écrivions les titres, ce qui nous a sans doute permis d'être un peu plus relax pendant l'enregistrement de l'album Dommage que je n'ai pas tenu un journal pendant cette période, cela serait marrant à relire maintenant.
Nasum Inhale/Exhale LP grindcore



Comme beaucoup de groupes de Grindcore avant et après vous, vous avez fait beaucoup de splits et de maxis/EPs. Quel en était l'objectif ? Etait-ce une dans le but de donner une chance à d'autres groupes ?

D'une certaine façon le split 7''EP ou le 7''EP tout seul est le format idéal pour un groupe de Grindcore. C'est assez long pour y mettre pas mal de morceaux, mais aussi assez court pour ne pas être répétitifs et chiants. Je crois qu'à nos débuts, savoir qu'Agathocles était un groupe de Grindcore ayant sorti un nombre dingue de Splits nous a en quelque sorte inspirés. Et l'un de leur splits s'est trouvé être avec nous, ce qui n'était pas du tout prévu. Je crois que l'enregistrement de l'EP Blind World était supposé être au départ un split avec le groupe Blood Duster. Donc, nous avons compilé des chansons avant d'être en capacité de faire quelque chose de plus gros, le Mini-CD Industrilaven.
Nous avons ensuite fait d'autres Splits en 7''EPs et sur des compilations, même quand nous avions commencé à faire des albums, mais au final c'est devenu plus important de se concentrer sur les albums. La plupart des combinaisons de groupes (pour les splits NdT) étaient décidées par les labels. Nous n'avions aucune connexion ni relation avec des groupes comme Abstain ou Warhate, la seule exception notable étant le split avec Skitsystem qui était prévue.

Sur votre deuxième album Human 2.0 (avec Mieszko Talarczyk à la guitare, basse et au chant lead, Anders Jakobson (toi) à la batterie et au chant secondaire et Jesper Liveröd à la basse) il semble que vous vouliez faire un album plus violent et contrasté. Les vocaux de Mieszko sont incroyablement hurlés mais il y a aussi un groove Hardcore. Quelle est pour vous la différence principale entre cet album et Ingale/Exhale ? Je sais que le groupe n'était pas emballé par le mix ?

Pour commencer, nous avons changé l'accordage de nos guitares pour passer d'un accordage en B standard à un Drop A. Cela nous a permis d'avoir un son plus Heavy mais surtout cela a rendu plus simple d'atteindre des harmonies différentes et nous approcher davantage d'un son personnel. Nous avions testé ça en enregistrant entre les albums où j'avais écrit quelques unes de mes chansons avec cet accordage et partant de là nous l'avons utilisé (pour conséquence, ce type d'accordage, bien que pas toujours aussi grave, a été utilisé dans touts mes groupes après Nasum, par exemple Coldworker et Axis of Despair. Le seul souci que cela nous a causé fut que nous avons dû réapprendre toutes les anciennes chansons de Nasum avec cet accordage. L'autre différence est que nous avons vraiment écrit un ALBUM et non juste une chanson après l'autre jusqu'à obtenir 45 minutes de musique, comme c'était le cas pour Inhale/Exhale. Par là je veux dire que nous étions mieux préparés au type de chansons que nous devions écrire pour faire un album varié qui permettrait à celui qui l'écoute de s'éclater. Nous savions aussi, suite au succès d'Inhale/Exhale que nous avions désormais une fanbase, ou du moins un certain nombre de gens qui écoutait notre musique. Nous n'avions jamais vraiment eu ce sentiment à nos touts débuts, qui étaient plus ou moins avant l'ère d'Internet. Alors, d'une certaine façon, nous écrivions pour un public. Le groove Hardcore que nous avons ajouté peut être vu comme un moyen de varier un peu plus les morceaux, mais cela était aussi très inspiré du travail que Mieszko avait fait avec d'autres groupes en studio . Un morceau comme "Shadows" est très inspiré par le groupe Nine avec lequel il a enregistré quelques albums (et aussi peut être la raison pour laquelle la note "Merci a tous les groupes auxquels nous avons piqué des riffs" est dans les crédits...) Je pense aussi que le fait que nous avions commencé à faire des concerts aussi bien avec des groupes de Hardcore que de Death Metal a eu un effet sur notre son. La dernière différence est que Mieszko est devenu le chanteur lead. Depuis Inhale/Exhale Nasum était davantage un projet studio et nous partagions les vocaux à 50/50, mais quand nous avons commencé à jouer live, Mieszka a du faire toutes les voix. Je chante toujours beaucoup sur Human 2.0 mais Mieszko était définitivement devenu le lead. Quand nous avons fait le mixage je ne peux pas dire que nous n'étions pas satisfaits de celui-ci. En vérité je me souviens très bien être assis au Soundlan studios avec Mieszko écoutant l'album et l'appréciant vraiment. Il est possible que le son ait changé durant le mastering, qui a été réalisé aux USA, masi je crois que cela n'a pas changé grand chose. Avec le recul je me dis que cela aurait chouette avec un son un peu plus clair car c'est compliqué d'entendre ce que nous faisions, mais d'un autre côté le son donne à l'album une identité propre. Je crois que Mieszko testait de nouvelles idées ou un nouvel équipement à l'époque, si vous écoutez l'album Carnivorous Erection de Regurgitate enregistré au même moment, il a la même production et le même son.




Au début du XXIème siècle vous êtes devenus un des plus grands groupes de Grind du monde, mais en fait aussi un des plus grands groupes de Metal. Vous étiez appréciés aussi bien par des fans de Hardcore que de Metal. Comment analyses-tu cela, presque vingt ans plus tard ?

Bon, tout d'abord, j'aimerai modérer un peu les choses. Tant qu'il y a un Napalm Death, il ne peut y avoir de plus grand groupe de Grindcore ! et "un des plus grands groupes de Metal sur terre" n'est pas vrai, haha ! Mais tu as un raison jusqu'à un certain point. Nous étions devenus assez gros, dans la mesure où un groupe de Grindcore peut le devenir, et c'est assez étrange aujourd'hui de se remémorer cela. Je crois que tout garçon ou fille qui lance son groupe rêve de devenir grand, mais peu d'entre eux arrivent à un niveau ou ils sont considérés comme un des groupes du Top Ten pour toujours dans ce genre spécifique. Maintenant, le Grindcore est devenu un genre plus confidentiel, mais n'empêche que c'est toujours flatteur d'être mentionné sur la page Wikipédia consacrée au Grincore comme un des exemples principaux ou d'être placé dans l'arbre généalogique de la famille Metal dans le documentaire "Metal Evolution". C'est bizarre ! je pense que nous avions le timing parfait quand nous avons sorti Inhale/Exhale en 1998. La vague Grindcore des années 80 et 90 s'était calmée et Napalm Death essayaient d'autres sonorités, et nous avons comblé un vide avec notre album. Ça aurait pu être un désastre mais ça a marché et c'est ce qui nous a permis d'atteindre ce statut.


Helvete en 2003, était ce un hommage au magasin d'Euronymous ? (lol, si vous voulez des blagues qui tombent à plat, appelez moi NdT) L'album reste violent mais peut être plus mélodique que les deux premiers. Es-tu d'accord ? A cette même époque Nostromo est devenu un gros groupe aussi, que pensiez vous de ce qu'ils faisaient ? 


Non, Helvete est le mot suèdois pour "enfer", un juron courant et un mot qui a un effet puissant qui collait bien pour un titre d'album à l'époque, par rapport aux textes et tout le reste. C'est le même mot en Norvégien et en Danois. Mais je sais que cela a un sens complètement différent pour les français ... Sur un plan musical je pense qu'Helvete est la suite logique des albums précédents mais pas vraiment si DIFFERENT. La grande différence est certainement la production, qui est bine meilleure. Sans doute la meilleure des quatre albums. Il est un peu plus "produit" ce qui vient du fait que Mieszko devenait meilleur comme ingénieur du son et producteur. Pour moi c'est le mélange parfait entre le fait de faire de la musique vraiment dure et extrême mais en la rendant accessible pour des personnes qui ne sont pas forcément des fans de Grindcore. Et ça a fonctionné : nous avons reçu beaucoup de bons retours pour cet album, nous avons gagné deux Awards en Suède et plein d'autres choses. La seule chose que nous n'avons pas faite a été de tourner pour l'album , et je parlerai de cela plus loin dans l'interview...Nous avions Nostromo en première partie pour quelques dates sur la tournée avec Napalm Death en 2000. Nous avons joué avec eux au début et encore vers la fin de la tournée. C'était comme retrouver des vieux copains alors qu'ils étaient de nouvelles connaissances. Bref, ils étaient en tournée pour leur EP Eyesore et la chanson "Collapse" était une de celles qui sortaient du lot avec ses parties rythmiques. Je peux dire de manière claire que cela a inspiré la fin du morceau " Scoop" sur Helvete. Mieszko a alors enregistré leur album Ecce Lex à Örebro en 2002. Je suis content que Nostromo soit de retour sur la scène et leur reprise de la chanson "Corrosion", un titre que j'ai écrit il y a vingt ans est carrément sans pitié !





Crois tu qu'un genre aussi codifié que le Grindcore peut évoluer ?



Jusqu'à un certain point, oui. Mais de mon point de vue, le Grindcore est un des rares genres où les frontières sont limitées. Il n'y a pas de "hors des sentiers battus" pour le Grindcore, sinon ce n'est plus du Grindcore. Prenez le Death Metal par exemple. Aujourd'hui vous en avez plein de sous-genres, comme le Death Metal industriel, le Pagan Death Metal, le Death Metal mélodique, le blackened Death Metal ou tout ce qu'un groupe peut trouver. Pour moi il n'y a pas d'espace pour du "Viking Grindcore", pour prendre un exemple ridicule. C'est clair que je viens de l'ancienne école du Grindcore, qui reste basiquement du Punk Hardcore ultra-rapide, et j'adore vraiment ce style. Parmi les groupes modernes, certains ont un autre background et, pour certains, des sons plus sophistiqués, du coup au final ça devient une affaire de goût. Mais pour moi, ce que je vois comme étant le Grindcore est vraiment net et précis.


C'est toujours triste d'aborder l'album Shift, a cause de ce qui est arrivé à Mieszko ce jour affreux. L'album est très intense et plus noir que tout ce que vous avez fait auparavant. Pour moi il y a des parties qui sonnent Black/Death Metal sur ce disque. Était-ce à cause du genre de musique que vous écoutiez en travaillant sur l'album ? Peux tu nous en dire plus sur la réalisation de ce dernier album ?

Après l'enregistrement de Helvete nous avons recruté Urban Skytt comme deuxième guitariste. Il a fait son premier concert avec nous à la soirée de sortie du disque à Örebro. Quelques mois après Jesper a quitté le groupe et nous avons recruté Jon Lindquist comme nouveau bassiste. A cette époque nous travaillions sur une tournée européenne et notre agent avait commencé à booker les dates. Alors les choses sont devenues étranges. Nous avions du mal à rentrer en contact avec notre agent et quand nous avons fini par le joindre l'itinéraire était incomplet et les dates n'étaient pas posées sur la période que nous souhaitions. Il devint clair pour nous qu'il était épuisé et en incapacité de faire son job. Un autre agent a essayé de réparer les erreurs mais ce n'était plus possible. Nous avons du annuler la tournée et donc nous nous sommes retrouvés dans l'impossibilité de tourner pour helvete. A la place, nous nous somme donc remis à l'écriture. Nous étions satisfaits du travail que Relapse avait fait pour nous sur les trois premiers albums, mais comme notre contrat était rempli (ou du moins nous le pensions) nous avons échangé avec Burning Heart Records, basés sur Örebro, qui avaient leur bureau juste un étage en dessous des studios Soundlab. Nous avons pensé que ce serait bien pour nous de travailler avec un label européen car notre marché le plus important était en Europe. L'idée était de commencer par un mini-album et voir comment les chose allaient tourner. Nous avions déjà des chansons écrites et nous étions prêts à enregistrer, mais après avoir quitté Burning Heart juste après notre première rencontre, Mieszko et moi avons évoqué les dangers de faire un mini-album. Nous sentions que le nombre de chansons que nous avions, entre 12 et 15 pourraient faire qu'il soit considéré comme un album par les magasins et autres, et donc vendu au prix d'un album alors que notre but était de faire un produit pas cher. Du coup, l'idée n'était plus attirante du tout et nous avons décidé d'écrire un peu plus et de faire un véritable album, ce qui ne dérangeait pas Burning Heart. Malheureusement notre contrat avec Relapse n'était pas vraiment rempli et donc nous avons eu quelques problèmes, qui au final ont abouti à un accord faisant que Relapse distribuerait l'album aux USA. Avec le recul, je pense que le changement de label a causé plus de problèmes que de bénéfices, surtout que Burning Heart venait de fusionner avec Epitaph et qu'ils ne s'intéressaient plus beaucoup à Nasum. Malgré tout, l'album Shift était bon, et, à l'époque, les différents labels ont bien travaillé pour nous. Concernant la production de l'album - Je me souviens que nous étions dans un bon état d'esprit dans le groupe à ce moment là. Mieszko et moi avons reçu de l'énergie de la part des nouveaux membres, mais comme nous étions éloignés géographiquement (Mieszko et moi à Örebro et Jon et Urban à Stockholm) il est vite devenu évident que pour finir les compos pour l'album nous ne pourrions travailler les chansons en groupe qu'à 50 %. Le reste des morceaux fut réalisé par Mieszko et moi. Je me souviens de la session d'enregistrement comme étant un peu relâchée et spontanée, ce qui était un super sentiment et quelque chose que nous aurions pu poursuivre dans le futur. La raison pour laquelle certains morceaux sonnent davantage Metal vient peut-être du fait que nous étions inspirés en tant que groupe à deux guitaristes. Nous avions un nouveau son en live et nous savions que nous pourrions reproduire les chansons les plus "produites" sur scène. Je crois que cela a eu un impact sur l'écriture des titres. C'est judicieux que tu trouves des sonorités Black Metal, parce qu'il y en a bien. Je ne suis pas personnellement un gros fan de Black Metal, je ne suis jamais trop rentré dedans, mais il y avait des trucs que j'aimais bien. En repassant mes chansons sur l'album, il y a une évidente influence Black Metal sur "The Engine Of Death", qui avait pour titre de travail "NasuMayhem" (C'est clair au moins NdT). Mais en toute honnêteté j'ai été inspiré par des riffs que Urban avait écrit, qui étaient très différents du genre de trucs habituels qu'il écrivait pour Regurgitate.






Bon, nous ne pouvons pas ne pas parler de la mort de Mieszko. Je peux imaginer à quel point cela a dû être affreux pour vous tous. Quand la décision de splitter fut-elle prise ? Avez-vous eu le moindre doute à ce sujet ?

Ce fut une décision très rapide dès que nous avons su qu'il n'y avait aucune chance qu'il ait survécu. Peut-être aurions nous dû prendre quelques mois pour digérer cette réalité et ensuite en venir à une conclusion, mais les tripes nous disaient que la perte de Mieszko était une énorme perte pour le groupe. Ce n'était pas juste un membre qui avait quitté le groupe, c'était la voix principale, un des principaux auteurs et le producteur. Continuer le groupe et faire de nouvelles chansons et de nouveaux enregistrements n'aurait pas été pareil, et en priorité nous devions faire notre deuil. 5 ou 6 après quand nous avons parlé de faire ce qui allait devenir une tournée d'adieux en 2012 c'était déjà plus simple. C'était la suite du groupe Nasum sur scène et pas le groupe qui enregistrait. Mais en revenant en 2005 et à la décision d'arrêter le groupe (c'était la meilleure décision d'arrêter d'être un groupe existant et se produisant sur scène dans ce sesn) mais j'ai tout de suite ressenti que cela ne serait pas juste pour les fans, pour Mieszko et pour moi de juste "retirer la prise". Nous avions quelques sorties de prévues et nous avions un entourage que nous ne pouvions ignorer, du coup j'ai décidé de garder le groupe vivant comme un "concept", en l’absence de meilleur mot, en ayant un site web actif (et, avec la temps, une page Facebook) et garder le dialogue avec les fans. Nasum représente une grande part de ma vie que je ne peux effacer d'un geste.






Grind Finale et Doombringer peuvent être considérés comme des hommages à Mieszko. Quel était le but derrière ces disques pour vous en tant que groupe ?

Il est important de faire remarquer que ces deux projets avaient été planifiés alors que Mieszko était toujours vivant. Le fait de compiler des morceaux qui n'étaient sur aucun album était en gestation depuis des années. Nous avions récupéré les masters et avions fait des tentatives pour assembler le projet. En fait, nous avions prévu de travailler là dessus dans le studio de Mieszko quelques jours avant qu'il parte en vacances en Thaïlande, mais cela n'est jamais arrivé. Quand j'ai pris sur moi de compléter le projet cela avait évidemment un autre sens que juste faire une compilation rétrospective. C'est devenu pour moi une façon de faire avec le deuil suite à la mort de Mieszko et de plonger profondément dans notre héritage musical depuis le début jusqu'à la fin. Cela aurait dû marquer notre "milieu de carrière" mais c'est devenu la fin, d'où le titre Grind Finale. Doombringer n'était honnêtement pas prévu avant sa mort comme une sortie simple mais comme notre face d'un Split-LP avec Napalm Death. Beaucoup de fans de Nasum doivent savoir que cet enregistrement était supposé sortir en picture disc en split avec Napalm Death, avant que nous le sortions séparément, mais le split a été reporté et Relapse a sorti le CD/LP Doombringer en premier. Nous avions tourné au Japon avec Napalm Death en 2004 et avions discuté de réaliser un split-live de cette tournée dans la mesure ou notre ingénieur du son ait de quoi faire avec de bons enregistrements des concerts. A nouveau, c'est devenu mon projet de finir l'enregistrement pour une sortie quelques année après la mort de Mieszko.




Que font les anciens membres en 2018 . Quel regard portez-vous sur la scène actuelle . Y'a t'il de nouveaux groupes que tu apprécies ?

En ce qui me concerne, j'ai continué à faire partie de la scène Grindcore avec mon "nouveau" groupe Axis of Despair. Nous existons depuis quelques années, et nous avons sorti notre premier album Contempt fo Man un peu plus tôt cette année. Jesper est devenu second guitariste dans le groupe de Fastcore Massgray. "Changement de carrière" surprenant mais toujours très excitant. Burst (groupe de Metal progressif dans lequel joue Jesper NdT) s'est réuni une fois cette année aussi et cela pourrait se reproduire, je pense. Urban a été "promu" en tant que Dr Skytt et tient la deuxième guitare dans General Surgery depuis quelques années maintenant. Je ne crois pas que Regurgitate soit offciellement mort mais ils n'ont rien fait depuis longtemps. Jon joue toujours dans Victims et tourne pas mal, seulement dépassé par Keijo qui est toujours sur la route avec une formation ou une autre, que ce soit Rotten Sound, Goat Burnet ou Morbid Evil. Concernant les nouveaux groupes j'ai bien peur de ne pas être très à jour. J'ai du mal a être enthousiasmé par de nouveaux groupes, en tout cas pas autant que je pouvais l'être avant. Peu importe le genre, je vais plus écouter des vieux trucs que chercher quelque chose de nouveau. Mais au sujet de la scène Grindcore en particulier je crois que ma dernière découverte est Meth Leppard (Waouh le nom ! NdT). J'espère qu'ils vont trouver un bassiste. Je ne suis pas fan de l'actuelle tendance du grindcore "sans bassiste"...


Pour finir, peux tu nous donner ton Top Ten du Grindcore ?


Eh bien, si je dois faire une liste des meilleurs trucs en Grindcore je dois inclure tout type de format. Et, pour être encore plus précis, cette liste est un guide pour comprendre comment mon gout pour le Grind s'est développé, par ordre alphabétique :

Assück – Complete discography
Brutal Truth – Extreme Conditions… LP
Carcass – Reek of Putrefaction LP
Dropdead – s/t G-Anx – Complete discography
Napalm Death – Mentally Murdered 12” EP
Napalm Death – Peelsessions
Napalm Death/S.O.B. – split 7” flexi
Terrorizer – World Downfall LP
Repulsion – Horrified LP



ANDERS









NASUM OFFICIAL WEBSITE






LE SCRIBE DU ROCK FACEBOOK PAGE















Posts les plus consultés de ce blog

INTERVIEW AVEC FAMINE DE KPN DEPUIS KIEV

Du Porno, du Grind et de la déconne ? Interview de GRONIBARD !!!

Dark Dandy : Une interview avec Rose Hreidmarr (ANOREXIA NERVOSA/BAISE MA HACHE)

Posts les plus consultés de ce blog

INTERVIEW AVEC FAMINE DE KPN DEPUIS KIEV

Du Porno, du Grind et de la déconne ? Interview de GRONIBARD !!!

Dark Dandy : Une interview avec Rose Hreidmarr (ANOREXIA NERVOSA/BAISE MA HACHE)

INTERVIEW AVEC VINDSVAL (BLUT AUS NORD, YERUSELEM)

Interview with Extreme Noise Terror, kings of Crust / Interview avec Extreme Noise Terror, rois du Crust !

FRENCH METAL : Interview d'Arno Strobl (Freitot, Carnival in Coal, We All die Laughing, 6:33)

VOCIFERIAN Black/Death Metal : Interview

Pourquoi William Sheller est-il génial ?